Month: January 2014

Pacific Islander students can receive services through UHH PISC (Pacific Islander Student Center)

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The Center offers a broad spectrum of services and programs including lectures, panel discussions, workshops, films and videos, and musical, dance, and dramatic performances. All UH Hilo students are welcome at the Center. We think you’ll discover a “home away from home” right here in the middle of the UH Hilo campus. Stop by any time. You’re welcome here and we’d love to see you!

A Gathering Place

The Center is set up to be a gathering place for Pacific island students to meet each other, to study individually or in groups, or hold their meetings and events. Students can use our 10 Apple and PC desktop computers and sign out any of our 20 laptops for their use. To help students relax in between classes, we have a large flatscreen television which can play CNN news, ESPN, and other major network news channels. The Center also has a growing collection of books and DVDs on Pacific-related topics, includes a kitchen (including refrigerator, stove and microwave), a lanai with covered tables for group meetings or to eat your lunch. Please contact pisc@hawaii.edu if you wish to schedule a meeting or event at the PISC.

Student Development & Support

Bridge Program

Fifteen students who have been accepted to UHH will be selected to participate in an intensive 7-day residential bridge program on campus prior to the start of the fall orientation week each year. The program is designed to introduce first-year students to college-level expectations for writing, mathematics, critical inquiry, study skills/strategies, different learning and teaching styles, and campus resources, as well as to encourage help seeking behaviors which many minority students lack. Find out more>>

Learning Communities

The Center will arrange small learning communities in which students from similar cultural backgrounds who are enrolled in the same programs and/or courses will study together in small groups at the Pacific Islander Student Center and support each other’s success. Learning communities in particular will be constructed in ways that capitalize on Pacific Island identity and values. Pacific Islanders tend to identify with a unit larger than individuals, such as with families, clans, villages, and islands. Pacific Island cultures value group cohesion and harmony more strongly than individual success; a positive group reputation is strongly valued, and competition between groups often serves as an effective motivator. In light of that, great potential exists in developing and implementing approaches that aim to facilitate the success of students by motivating and rewarding them as groups, rather than as individuals. Thus, the project will construct learning communities that motivate and reward groups, enhance group reputation, and promote healthy competition between groups as a culturally informed service.

Peer Mentoring

The Center has partnered with the Minority Access & Achievement Program to utilize its PALS peer mentoring program for interested first year Pacific Islander students. Students will meet regularly with an assigned peer mentor throughout the first year, who will provide guidance, advice, encouragement and support as they assist them in building solid academic foundations and developing habits and attitudes that lead to academic and
personal success.

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HELP (Highly Engaged Learning Positions) Symposium set for May 3, 2014

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Mark Your Calendar!
HELP Symposium
Pacific Islander Student Center
University of Hawaii at Hilo
Friday, May 2, 2014
 
Special Presenters: Dr. Lola Bautista and 8 senior student researchers from the Pacific Islands Studies Program at UH Manoa who will present the results of their community-based research on COFA community challenges, successes, and other topics. 
 
The Highly Engaged Learning Positions (HELP) Symposium is a biannual daylong symposium (Spring & Fall) sponsored by the Pacific Islander Student Center to showcase presentations by Pacific Islander students at UH Hilo who are funded to work on campus, community organizations, businesses, and government agencies in Hawaii or back home in their respective home islands (summer) on projects related to their field of studies or their future career aspirations. The HELP Symposium is open to the public.
I have invited the CLASS participants to meet again at UH Hilo on Saturday, May 3, 2014 to follow up on our planned actions. This will enable COFACAN members from Oahu to attend the HELP Symposium on Friday and stay overnight for the CLASS meeting. Hopefully, more COFACAN members can join us in Hilo.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

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National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

E-Cards

No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. By calling 1-800-273-TALK (8255) you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area, anytime 24/7.

Telemarketing Tactics by Mail-Order Suppliers of Home Diabetes-testing supplies

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The Senior Medicare Patrol is…….. LOOKING OUT FOR YOU

PREVENT DETECT REPORT 

DATE: 1/21/14 2014-1 

SUBJECT: Telemarketing Tactics by Mail-Order Suppliers of Home Diabetes-Testing Supplies 

If you have Original Medicare, and you have diabetes and get your diabetes testing supplies delivered to your home, take note of this important ALERT! 

Medicare’s National Mail-Order Program for diabetes testing supplies began on July 1, 2013. You now need to use a supplier in this program in order to have Medicare pay for diabetes testing supplies that are delivered to your home.

Some suppliers use marketing companies to send out postcards to people with Medicare to get personal information for suppliers to make sales calls. If you reply to these postcards, you may not know how the information you give on the postcard will be used.

You may receive sales calls that pressure you to switch vendors or confuse you by telling you that you have a new supplier. As bait, they may offer what they claim to be the latest blood glucose monitor FREE – to get you to give out your Medicare number and your doctor’s name.

Testing supplies may even be shipped to your home even though you did not enroll in the supplier’s mail-order program and your doctor did not send in a prescription.

1.  Make sure your mail-order supplier is an approved supplier in Medicare’s National Mail-Order Program. Tell your doctor to write the name of your chosen supplier in your medical record.

2. If you receive a telemarketing call from someone who is not your mail-order supplier, don’t give out your Medicare number. Hang up.

3. If unordered items arrive at your home, refuse the delivery. Don’t open the box. Give it back to your mail carrier to return to the sender. If you opened the box, call the supplier and ask for a shipping label. If they tell you they will close your account but tell you to keep the supplies, return the supplies anyway so they can’t turn around and bill Medicare. Make sure to get a return receipt.

4. Notify Medicare at 1-800-633-4227. Check your Medicare Summary Notice to make sure Medicare does not pay for the supplies you returned. Call the Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP Hawaii) at 586-7281 or 1-800-296-9422 if you need help.

10th Annual Celebrate Your Family Event – April 5, 10:00 AM

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PARENTS Logo with Motto
How can we MALAMA
 (to care for, to protect) 
our keiki and 
keep them safe from child abuse and neglect?

January 2014
 

East Hawaii Coalition against Child Abuse and Neglect asks you to
SAVE THE DATE!
WHAT: Celebrate Your Family Community Event
WHERE: Sangha Hall, 424 Kilauea Avenue, Hilo
WHEN: 4/5/14 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM
 
Community partners, mark your calendars and prepare your activities for your families!
The whole family is invited to attend the 10th annual Celebrate Your Family event! This FREE, family-centered event offers community resources, activities for keiki, and entertainment by children and adult community members.
 
The event is being presented by the East Hawaii Coalition to Prevent Child Abuse and Neglect, in recognition of April’s designation as National Child Abuse Prevention Month. The coalition is a partnership of public and private providers, faith based groups, service organizations, community associations, businesses and concerned individuals that serve the districts of north and south Hilo, Hamakua, and Puna.
For further information, call 934-9552 (PARENTS, Inc., Hilo) or 
965-5550 (Neighborhood Place of Puna)
FREE FOR ALL FAMILIES, COME AND CELEBRATE YOUR OHANA!
MALAMA
Make time for family and put smiles on the faces of your keiki
Ask for help when needed and learn about community resources
Listen to one another and create opportunities to be together
Appreciate your keiki and create healthy relationships
Motivate our communities to keep children safe from child abuse and neglect
Always share aloha with your ‘ohana and most importantly malama your keiki
   
Our Vision: All children in East Hawaii will grow up in a nurturing environment and become healthy and productive members of our community.
 
Our Mission: Empowering our community to keep children safe from child abuse and neglect.
 

HVNP 2014 Hawaiian Cultural, After Dark in the Park Programs and Fee-Free Days schedule

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Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park News Release

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park February 2014 

Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Programs


Hawaii National Park, Hawai‘i – Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in February. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

What We Don’t Know About Hawaiian Volcanoes. For all that scientists have learned about Hawaiian volcanoes during the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory’s first 100 years, there are still questions to be answered.  James Dwight Dana, one of the first geologists to study Hawaiian volcanoes, called these unknowns “points requiring elucidation” in his book, Characteristics of Volcanoes, in 1890.  In the years since, many of Dana’s points have been addressed, but some have not.  A number of new questions have also arisen, thanks to years of continuous observation and study of Kīlauea, Mauna Loa, and other Hawaiian volcanoes.  USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientist Mike Poland will discuss the big issues faced by volcanologists studying Hawai‘i’s volcanoes today, from the source of magma deep within the Earth to predicting eruptions—or determining when an ongoing eruption will end! Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Feb. 4, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Up in Arms! The Struggle to Preserve the Legacy of the National Park Service During Wartime.
Park archeologist Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura shares a revealing and fascinating presentation of the challenges faced by the National Park Service before, during, and after World War II at Kīlauea, in what was then called Hawai‘i National Park. The findings of Moniz-Nakamura’s extensive research were recently published in The Hawaiian Journal of History, vol. 47 (2013). Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Feb. 11, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kalo Demonstration. Join Sam and Edna Buldado as they share the cultural uses of the kalo (taro) plant. Kalo is used for many things, including food, medicine, glue, and dyes – making it one of the most important plants in all of Hawai‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Feb. 13, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Russell Mauga in Concert.
Enjoy an evening of contemporary Hawaiian music through the vibrant voice and slack-key guitar styling of Russell Mauga, one of Hawai‘i Island’s top entertainers.  Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Wed., Feb. 19, from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Lei Hulu a me Ulana Pāpale Lauhala. Join master lei maker Kilohana Domingo as he demonstrates the intricate art of lei hulu, or feather lei making. His mother, Lehua Domingo, will share the detailed ‘anoni style of weaving pandanus leaves into an exquisite pāpale, or hat. Both lei hulu and pāpale will be on display. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Feb. 26, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Fee-Free Days at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park in 2014

Hawaii National Park, Hawai‘i – Mark your calendars for these nine fee-free dates at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park in 2014:

January 20, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Celebrate the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and volunteer to remove invasive ginger along the summit of Kīlauea, 9 a.m. to noon. Meet project leader Paul Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center. Bring a hat, raingear, garden gloves, day pack, snacks and water. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Walk-ins welcome, no advance registration required. Entrance is free all day.

February 15-17, President’s Day weekend

April 19-20, National Park Week’s opening weekend

August 25, National Park Service’s 98th Birthday

September 27, National Public Lands Day

November 11, Veterans Day

Hawai‘i Volcanoes is one of five national park units on the island of Hawai‘i. Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park is also free of charge on the NPS fee-free 2014 dates. Pu‘ukoholā Heiau National Historic Site, Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park, and the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail do not charge entrance fees. Information on special offerings at parks nationwide is available at http://www.nps.gov/findapark/feefreeparks.htm.

 

KRHCAI to offer iCAN workshops through HawCC and DLIR WDD collaboration

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Hawai‘i CC and the State of Hawai‘i Workforce Development Division are collaborating to offer free Individualized Career Achievement Network (iCAN) workshops for anyone interested in improving their reading, writing, math and workplace skills.

Open to anyone over 18, whether or not they have a high school diploma, these free iCAN workshops prepare individuals for the workforce as they pursue a National Career Readiness Certificate.  This certificate demonstrates that these individuals have a certain level of workplace employability skills.  

The program is funded through a grant awarded under the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training Grants (C3T), as implemented by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration.

The iCAN workshops, which will be held at the Kau Resource and Distance Learning Center in Pahala pending the hiring of an instructor(s), are a great way for employees and job seekers to improve their employability skills. To register and for more information, contact Serrylee Kanakaole-Wong, Student Support Specialist, at 981-2860 ext. 232.