News

Native Hawaiian & Pacific Islander Hawai’i COVID-19 3R Team Updates – November 20, 2020

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www.NHPICOVIDHawaii.net
The Hawaii Department of Health updates Race data each Friday at 12:00 PM.
Note: No Race (Ethnicity) Data for 24% of all confirmed cases.

Click on the image to navigate the DOH Dashboard.

TONIGHT!

PASEFIKA SU’I FEFILOI

Music, comedy and important messages for all of our Pacific Island communities.  Tune in!

TESTING THIS WEEK

HAWAI’I COVID-19 CLUSTER REPORT – 11/12/2020
Discipline – Unite Against COVID
OHA PSA
www.NHPICOVIDHawaii.net
Where federal funds are going in Hawai’i
Source: Hawai’i Data Collaborative
Updated as of November 16, 2020
Child Care Stimulus Grant Program in Hawai’i
In-Language Reopening Strategy Documents
VARIOUS SOCIAL SUPPORT SERVICES
www.NHPICOVIDHawaii.net

WE ARE OCEANIA – BILINGUAL HOTLINE 808-913-1364
Hawai’i DOH – Safe Gatherings Guide
www.NHPICOVIDHawaii.net
Facebook
Instagram: @hawaiinextgen
TikTok: @nextgenhawaii
Twitter: @GenHawaii
www.NHPICOVIDHawaii.net
Hiring Bilingual Helpline Specialists.  Seeking qualified people, who can work in-office as a Helpline Specialist in any of the following languages: Chuukese, Marshallese, Kosraean, Yapese, Pohnpeian, Palauan, or Samoan.
Click on the image above for more info or to apply.
Native Hawaiian & Pacific Islander Community Influencers

Vacancy Announcements for Medical and Public Health Surge Responders for the Republic of the Marshall Islands Ministry of Health and Human Services, Oct 30, 2020

State of Hawai’i – Holidays and COVID-19 Guide

What is the burden of COVID-19 on
Pacific Island and Native Hawaiian communities
in Hawai’i?

The Native Hawaiian & Pacific Islander Hawai’i COVID-19 Response, Recovery & Reslilience Team (NHPI 3R) was established in May 2020, in alignment with the national NHPI Response Team, to improve the collection and reporting of accurate data, identify and lend support to initiatives across the Hawaiian Islands working to address COVID-19 among Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, and unify to establish a presence in the decision-making processes and policies that impact our communities.  More than 40 agencies, organizations and departments comprise this NHPI 3R Team.

COMMITTEES

  • Testing, Tracing & Isolation             Mondays, 2 – 4 PM
  • Policy                                               Mondays, 4 – 6 PM
  • Social Support/Recovery                Tuesdays, 12 – 2 PM
  • Communications                             Thursdays, 12:45 – 2 PM
  • Data & Research                             Fridays, 10 AM – 12 PM

To participate in a committee, please complete this survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/6P2WJL9

To share information or resources, complete this form: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/6FXZJRG

Find Out More
https://www.facebook.com/Native-Hawaiian-Pacific-Islander-Hawaii-Covid-19-3R-Team-110495344029978/?modal=admin_todo_tour
Website
Copyright © 2020 PAPA OLA LOKAHI, All rights reserved.

E-mail us at:
nhpicovid@papaolalokahi.org
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Peace for Everyone

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DVAC-PeaceForEveryone

This Thursday, October 22, 2020, at 7:00 p.m. on KHON2

Watch the show! Enjoy the 1-hour program on KHON2, hosted by Tannya Joaquin and John Veneri. “Peace for Everyone” is a virtual fundraiser to make up for 2020 fundraising cancelled due to COVID-19. It’s a special evening of learning, sharing and healing.

Domestic Violence Action Center | PO Box 3198, Honolulu, HI 96801

Aloha Connects Innovation (ACI)

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From: Pono Shim <pshim@oedb.biz>
Date: September 20, 2020 at 10:30:10 AM HST

Aloha mai kakou,  

For the past 3 months we (Economic Development Alliance of Hawaii, skilled consultants, and program designer Omar Sultan) have been working on a program to work with the State of Hawaii to use Cares Act Funding to assist displaced workers or individuals who have been significantly affected financially by COVID 19. This past week with the signing of the contract the Governor issued the Press Release with the Department of Business Economic Development and Tourism.  

The State’s program funding will help 350 participants to be placed in Host Companies who have the ability and need to host, train, and support a couple of participants in their organizations thru a paid internship thru December 15th. We know that we cannot help the thousands of individuals suffering thru the pandemic and that there are more businesses that would like to participate then we can onboard. However, we strongly recommend and hope that you will register as either a “Participant” or “Host Company” (if you can support a couple of interns and are aligned with the objectives/compliance of the program).  

Please visit www.edahawaii.org and click on Aloha Connects Innovation “learn more” tab. When you enter the page please select either Participant or Host Company based on your interest and review the information. When you get to the bottom of the page you can select “learn more” to be a Participant (you can register there) or if you’re desiring to be a Host Company you can select “register”. We should be following up with you within the week.  

To reiterate we know we cannot assist all (including companies who would like to Host participants) in being placed in ACI but please don’t be discouraged. If more funding is released thru Congress and subsequently our local Government we believe that we have designed infrastructure for more funding to be invested to help more people discover new career opportunities and skills for their future thru ACI.  

To that point we would love the opportunity to train/prepare displaced workers to position themselves for these types of opportunities regardless if they get placed or not. In a partnership with Microsoft and my Higher Skills Academy training we have opened up training that we begin every 2 weeks for free. We also know that thru these trainings we are opening relationships with ourselves with the hope that these relationships can be helpful to your future. If this is of value to you please register here:

Friday, October 2, 2020 10:00 AM Hawaii – Higher Skills Academy
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZAqf-GhpjgpE9AyISQQ8hakSCr4YqU2-gLG

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.   Another free training (thru the end of the 2020 year) you can immediately register thru the Hawaii Technology Development Corporation website https://www.htdc.org/workforce-recovery-initiative-by-coursera/ for over 3800 courses thru the Coursera online learning platform.  

If the menu options are too vast and you don’t know where to begin or choose and would like assistance in considering career opportunities and what pathway you might consider we are hosting a free “Choosing a Path” webinar on September 28 at noon please register here:

Monday, September 28, 2020 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM Hawaii –
“Choosing a Path” Webinar
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIsdeqqpz4oH9zFR5PZobyQXJd5umUeaSl9

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Please feel free to share this message with others.  

Mahalo nui loa,
Pono  
Pono Shim Oahu Economic Development Board

 Additional Higher Skills Academy registration dates will be posted on the OEDB websiteat www.oedb.biz as the information becomes available.

COVID-19 PHA Webinar: Clusters & Case Counts: Surviving the Second Wave with Lt. Gov. Josh Green

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August 5th Presenter will be Lieutenant Governor, Josh Green, MD.
https://youtu.be/v3xShwZ_nJI

With the rapid changes regarding COVID-19, it can be difficult to stay up to date with all that is happening in our islands. The Hawai‘i Public Health Institute (HIPHI) will be offering a series of webinars on the impact of COVID-19 on our communities.

After working hard to get our recorded cases down, how concerning are Hawaiiʻs current spikes in COVID-19 cases?

Find out what this means for our state and how we should be responding in our second update from Lieutenant Governor Josh Green.

Health Insurance Marketplace

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Health Insurance Marketplace

Welcome to the new HealthCare.gov

Health insurance is changing in 2014 — so we’ve updated HealthCare.gov to
help you get ready for the Health Insurance Marketplace.
Our mission is to help you understand your health coverage options so you
can enroll in a plan that meets your and your family’s needs. And if you run
a small business, we’ll help you find a plan that works for you and your employees.
Self employed? We’ve got that covered too.

New features include:

 
  • The most important health insurance info at your fingertips — just answer a few fast questions and we’ll provide you with a personalized list of coverage options, content you’ll want to read, and a checklist to help you get ready
  • An easy-to-understand question and answer format, with content based on the most common questions we hear
  • A simpler site structure and powerful search features that make it easy to find what you’re looking for
  • A seamless HealthCare.gov experience on your mobile device, tablet, laptop, or desktop computer
When open enrollment starts on October 1, 2013, you’ll be able to
apply, compare plans, and enroll. Coverage starts as soon as January 1, 2014

New Campaign Launched to Educate Americans about Health Insurance Marketplace

Posted on

New Campaign Launched to Educate Americans about Health Insurance Marketplace

HealthCare.gov
The Obama administration has launched a new educational campaign about the Health Insurance Marketplace. The new tools will help Americans understand their choices and select the coverage that best suits their health insurance needs when open enrollment begins on October 1, 2013. On the recently updated HealthCare.gov website, you can compare plans and get information about the Marketplace in your state. Customer service representatives are also available toll-free at 1-800-318-2596. People with hearing and/or speech disabilities may call using TTY/TDD technology at 1-855-889-4325.
Have health insurance questions? Answer a few quick questions.

Nine Days of Free Health Care Coming to Ka’ū in June

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Nine Days of Free Health Care Coming to Ka’ū in June

An innovative training program by the U.S. Department of Defense will bring 75 military reservists to Ka‘ū June 4-12 to provide free medical care in clinics open to the public.Tropic Care 2013 will run two clinics, at Ka‘ū High & Pāhala Elementary School and the Ocean View Community Center. Clinics will be open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., closing early at 12 p.m. on the final day, June 12.

Health care services that will be provided free of charge include physical exams, dentistry, optometry (exams and glasses), medication review and provision of some medication, and nutrition education. Patients will be seen on a first come, first served basis and are advised that there may be long wait times.

“This is an opportunity to bring needed medical, dental and vision services to the district of Ka‘ū,” said Aaron Ueno, Hawai‘i District Health Officer with the state Department of Health. “These services are open to the entire island and we are hoping to do this again in the future with community support.”

Tropic Care 2013 is a partnership between the U.S. Department of Defense and the state Hawai‘i District Health Office, supported by the County of Hawai‘i and the Ka‘ū Rural Health Community Association. It is an exercise of the Department of Defense’s Innovative Readiness Training program, which challenges reservists to plan and implement rapid mobilizations to distant and unfamiliar areas.

“We thank the Department of Defense and all the reservists for coming to Hawai‘i Island and reaching out to our residents,” said Karen Teshima, Executive Assistant to Mayor Billy Kenoi. “This innovative program will benefit everyone involved, and will further our goal of keeping our community safe and healthy.”

Other community partners collaborating to bring this service to Ka‘ū are: the Hawai‘i Department of Education, Ocean View Family Health Center, Hui Mālama Ola Nā ‘Ōiwi, Bay Clinic, Hawai‘i Island Cardiovascular, Hawai‘i Island Community Lung Assessment Science Studies, Ocean View Community Association, Kona Community Hospital, Hawai‘i Police Department, Hawai‘i National Guard’s Youth Challenge Academy, Ka‘ū Hospital, Pacific Quest, and the Veteran’s Administration.

For more information on Tropic Care 2013 or to request special assistance or an auxiliary aid seven days prior to the event, call (808) 974-6035 or email Martha Yamada of the Public Health Nursing Section at martha.yamada@doh.hawaii.gov.

To view the Hawaii County link to this information, please click here.

4/24/2013 Release from CFPB

Posted on Updated on

Assets Hawaii

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

April 24, 2013

CONTACT:

Office of Intergovernmental Affairs

Tel: (202) 435-9572

CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU FINDS PAYDAY AND DEPOSIT ADVANCE LOANS CAN TRAP CONSUMERS IN DEBT

Sustained Use of Loans Raises Consumer Protection Concerns

WASHINGTON, D.C. —Today the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) issued a report on payday and deposit advance loans finding that for many consumers these products lead to a cycle of indebtedness. Loose lending standards, high costs, and risky loan structures may contribute to the sustained use of these products which can trap borrowers in debt.

“This comprehensive study shows that payday and deposit advance loans put many consumers at risk of turning what is supposed to be a short-term, emergency loan into a long-term, expensive debt burden,” said CFPB Director Richard Cordray. “For too many consumers, payday and deposit advance loans are debt traps that cause them to be living their lives off money borrowed at huge interest rates.” The Payday Loans and Deposit Advance Products report is at: http://assetshawaii.org/r/D/NjY5MA/MTM4/0/0/a3JoY2FpQHlhaG9vLmNvbQ/aHR0cDovL2ZpbGVzLmNvbnN1bWVyZmluYW5jZS5nb3YvZi8yMDEzMDRfY2ZwYl9wYXlkYXktZGFwLXdoaXRlcGFwZXIucGRmIyEjIQ/0

The report found that payday loans and the deposit advance loans offered by a small but growing number of banks and other depository institutions are generally similar in structure, purpose, and the consumer protection concerns they raise. Both are typically described as a way to bridge a cash flow shortage between paychecks or other income. They offer quick and easy accessibility, especially for consumers who may not qualify for other credit. The loans generally have three features: they are small-dollar amounts; borrowers must repay them quickly; and they require that a borrower repay the full amount or give lenders access to repayment through a claim on the borrower’s deposit account.

The CFPB study is one of the most comprehensive ever undertaken on the market. It looked at a 12-month period with more than 15 million storefront payday loans and data from multiple depository institutions that offer deposit advance products.

Key Finding: Payday and deposit advance loans can become debt traps for consumers

The report found many consumers repeatedly roll over their payday and deposit advance loans or take out additional loans; often a short time after the previous one was repaid. This means that a sizable share of consumers end up in cycles of repeated borrowing and incur significant costs over time. The study also confirmed that these loans are quite expensive and not suitable for sustained use. Specifically, the study found limited underwriting and the single payment structure of the loans may contribute to trapping consumers in debt.

Loose Lending: Lenders often do not take a borrower’s ability to repay into consideration when making a loan. Instead, they may rely on ensuring they are one of the first in line to be repaid from a borrower’s income. For the consumer, this means there may not be sufficient funds after paying off the loan for expenses such as for their rent or groceries – leading them to return to the bank or payday lender for more money. ·

Payday: Eligibility to qualify for a payday loan usually requires proper identification, proof of income, and a personal checking account. No collateral is held for the loan, although the borrower does provide the lender with a personal check or authorization to debit her checking account for repayment. Credit score and financial obligations are generally not taken in to account. ·

Deposit Advance: Depository institutions have various eligibility rules for their customers, who generally already have checking accounts with them. The borrower authorizes the bank to claim repayment as soon as the next qualifying electronic deposit is received. Typically, though, a customer’s ability to repay the loan outside of other debts and ordinary living expenses is not taken into account.

Risky Loan Structures: The risk posed by the loose underwriting is compounded by some of the features of payday and deposit advance loans, particularly the rapid repayment structure. Paying back a lump sum when a consumer’s next paycheck or other deposit arrives can be difficult for an already cash-strapped consumer, leading them to take out another loan. ·

Payday: Payday loans typically must be repaid in full when the borrower’s next paycheck or other income is due. The report finds the median loan term to be just 14 days. ·

Deposit Advance: There is not a fixed due date with a deposit advance. Instead, the bank will repay itself from the next qualifying electronic deposit into the borrower’s account. The report finds that deposit advance “episodes,” which may include multiple advances, have a median duration of 12 days.

High Costs: Both payday loans and deposit advances are designed for short-term use and can have very high costs. These high costs can add up – on top of the already existing loans that a consumer is taking on. ·

Payday: Fees for storefront payday loans generally range from $10-$20 per $100 borrowed. For the typical loan of $350, for example, the median $15 fee per $100 would mean that the borrower must come up with more than $400 in just two weeks. A loan outstanding for two weeks with a $15 fee per $100 has an Annual Percentage Rate (APR) of 391 percent. ·

Deposit Advance: Fees generally are about $10 per $100 borrowed. For a deposit advance with a $10 fee per $100 borrowed on a 12-day loan, for example, the APR would be 304 percent.

Sustained Use: The loose underwriting, the rapid repayment requirement, and the high costs all may contribute to turning a short-term loan into a very expensive, long-term loan. For consumers, it is unclear whether they fully appreciate the risk that they may end up using these products much longer than the original term. Or, that they may end up paying fees that equal or exceed the amount they borrowed, leading them into a revolving door of debt. ·

Payday: For payday borrowers, nearly half have more than 10 transactions a year, while 14 percent undertook 20 or more transactions annually. Payday borrowers are indebted a median of 55 percent (or 199 days) of the year. For the majority of payday borrowers, new loans are most frequently taken on the same day a previous loan is closed, or shortly thereafter. ·

Deposit Advance: More than half of all users borrow more than $3,000 per year while 14 percent borrow more than $9,000 per year. These borrowers typically have an outstanding balance at least 9 months of the year and typically are indebted more than 40 percent of the year. And while these products are sometimes described as a way to avoid the high cost of overdraft fees, 65 percent of deposit advance users incur such fees. The heaviest deposit advance borrowers accrue the most overdraft fees.

The CFPB has authority to oversee the payday loan market. It began its supervision of payday lenders in January 2012. The CFPB also has authority to examine the deposit advance loans at the banks and credit unions it supervises, which are insured depository institutions and credit unions, and their affiliates, that have more than $10 billion in assets. Today’s report will help educate regulators and consumers about how the industry works and provide market participants with a clear statement of CFPB concerns.

While today’s study looked at storefront payday lenders, the CFPB will continue to analyze the growing online presence of such businesses. The Bureau is also looking at bank and credit union deposit account overdraft programs which provide short-term, small-dollar, immediate access credit services. The CFPB will publish initial results from this overdraft study later this spring.

To help educate consumers about payday and deposit advance loans, today the CFPB updated its Ask CFPB web tool to assist consumers with their financial questions about these products.

A factsheet about payday and deposit advance loans is available at: http://assetshawaii.org/r/D/NjcwMg/MTM4/0/0/a3JoY2FpQHlhaG9vLmNvbQ/aHR0cDovL2ZpbGVzLmNvbnN1bWVyZmluYW5jZS5nb3YvZi8yMDEzMDRfY2ZwYl9wYXlkYXktZmFjdHNoZWV0LnBkZiMhIyE/0

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The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is a 21st century agency that helps consumer finance markets work by making rules more effective, by consistently and fairly enforcing those rules, and by empowering consumers to take more control over their economic lives. For more information, visit consumerfinance.gov.